Facebook Copies Snapchat, Again

Facebook introduced Stories, like SnapchatIt was Snapchat which first came up with Stories, allowing people to share their photos, videos and updates for the day, something that will last 24 hours.

The feature soon became really popular. This is solely what made Snapchat popular in the first place. The ephemeral messaging app provided better control over privacy in a much simpler way. Soon, Instagram copied it. The Facebook owned photo sharing service soon introduced “Instagram Stories” that was just a mirror copy of Snapchat’s feature.

Stories came into WhatsApp next, another Facebook owned instant messaging service. In WhatsApp, it is called “Status” right now that initially replaced the textual status messages. WhatsApp, with an update, again bought out the textual status option too, but now calls it “about”.

On Tuesday, Facebook completed bringing Stories to all it’s apps by rolling out Facebook Stories. The feature lets people share videos and photographs in the Facebook app, which will appear on top of the News Feed. The Facebook Stories also disappear after 24 hours.

Facebook copied every single aspect of Snapchat’s stories. This includes a built in camera app with filters and stickers. As part of the roll-out, Connor Hayes, a Facebook product manager, wrote in a blog post:

“We want to make it fast, fun and easy for people to share creative photos and videos with whomever they choose, for however long they choose — and the more we share with each other, the more open and connected our community can be.”

Facebook and Snap, the company that owns Snapchat, has a complicated history. Facebook wanted to buy the messaging service in 2013 for 3 billion USD. But the offer was turned down by Snap. Snap turned down the offering because it’s philosophies did not quite align with that of Facebook. According to Snap, the ephemerality builds more authentic connections between people.

However, with a small user base, Snapchat is now not as profitable as it was before. Facebook could not buy Snapchat, but seems to be putting the final nail in its coffin.

Source: NYTimes 

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