People Having Paralysis Can Feel Again- New Medical Research Breakthrough

Nathan Copeland met a car accident when he was 18 years old and suffered from tetraplegia; that is paralysis of the four limbs. As a result, he lost the ability to control his hands.

But scientists have recently discovered a way to sense touch in part with paralysis yet again by experimenting on him.

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The feeling of touch is essential when using our hands. But previously there were no brain-controlled prosthetic limbs to be used for medical purpose.

Paralysis, Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm, Brain implant, robotic limbs, tetraplegia, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh

But recently, the groundbreaking experiment has helped a paralyzed man to sense touch again. The research was carried between the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in the United States. In the experiment, they created electrodes which were about the size of less than a grain of sand and positioned them in the cortex of the young paralyzed man who had a spinal cord injury and got paralysis.

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Researchers then stimulated the cortex region, that ultimately gave sensation to the right hand by bypassing the spinal cord injury.

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Copeland, the paralyzed man, was already transplanted with robotic limbs. As the fingers were pressed, the man with paralysis in right hand felt the pressure.

Paralysis, Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm, Brain implant, robotic limbs, tetraplegia, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh

The experiment was carried for several months with the man with paralysis in the right-hand that showed positive response always.

The research is undoubtedly a medical breakthrough. The experiment brings a ray of hope for the people with paralysis as the research shows that it can restore the functions of the paralyzed limbs.

Nathan Copeland volunteered for the experiment of the brain-controlled prosthetic limbs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Last US spring, surgeons embedded four mini electrodes into Copeland’s sensory cortex, precisely in the area of the brain that creates the sense of touch in the right hand and the fingers. The electrodes were stimulated that resulted in the sense of touch in the fingers by bypassing the damaged spinal cord.

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Source- CBS Baltimore

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